HarperCollins Speakers Bureau
HARPERCOLLINS SPEAKERS BUREAU
THE PREMIER LECTURE AGENCY FOR AUTHORS

Tara Conklin

New York Times Bestselling Author and Former Lawyer

SPEAKING TOPICS

  • Fiction Writing
  • Pivoting from Legal to a Creative Career
  • Resilience: Coming Back from Disappointment
  • Following Your Dream Late in Life
  • The Power of Storytelling
  • Family/Work Life Balance
  • An Evening with Tara Conklin

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Tara Conklin is a writer and former lawyer whose first novel, The House Girl (William Morrow), was a New York Times bestseller, #1 IndieNext pick, Target book club pick and has been translated into 8 languages. In February 2019, her second novel The Last Romantics (William Morrow) was published to wide acclaim.

A sweeping yet intimate epic about one American family, The Last Romantics is an unforgettable exploration of the ties that bind us together, the responsibilities we embrace and the duties we resent, and how we can lose—and sometimes rescue—the ones we love. A novel that pierces the heart and lingers in the mind, it is also a beautiful meditation on the power of stories—how they navigate us through difficult times, help us understand the past, and point the way toward our future. The Last Romantics became an instant New York Times bestseller, was a Barnes & Noble Book Club Pick, IndieNext Pick, and was selected by Jenna Bush Hager as the inaugural read for The Today Show Book Club.

From the power of storytelling to the journey of becoming a full-time writer, Conklin draws on her experiences, delivering compelling keynote presentations.

Before turning to fiction, Conklin worked for an international human rights organization and at corporate law firms in London and New York. She was born in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands and grew up in western Massachusetts. She holds a BA in history from Yale University, a JD from NYU School of Law and a Master of Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University. Conklin now lives in Seattle with her three kids, one tiny Havanese and one not-so-tiny veiled chameleon.

Praise for The Last Romantics:

“Tara Conklin is a generous writer who deftly brings us into the world of this fictional family, an engrossing and vivid place where I was happy to stay. The Last Romantics is a richly observed novel, both ambitious and welcoming.”
-- Meg Wolitzer

“Conklin examines her characters’ lives with generosity and an unflinching eye for the complexities of love and family.... Fans of Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections will find similar pleasures in the intelligence and empathy on display here.”
-- USA Today (four stars)

“It is the strength and fragility of the siblings’ bond, the evolving nature of love that is at the core of Conklin’s novel....Gracefully rendered, The Last Romantics focuses on the familiar theme of family with great originality.”
-- Washington Post

“Pick up The Last Romantics when you want to be swept into a fictional family....As the narrative traces [the Skinner siblings’] converging and diverging paths over the course of their lives—and promises made, kept, broken, changed—you’ll fall deeper and deeper in.”
--Goop

“A modern epic...in the vein of Commonwealth, The Last Romantics is a sweeping look at what binds families together.”
-- Glamour

“Perfectly paced, affecting fiction.”
-- Booklist

“An intimate, soul-searing examination of a modern family and the ties that bind, for better or worse.”
-- Stefanie Hargreaves, Shelf Awareness Galley Love of the Week

“Intensely moving.”
-- Shanina Piyarali, Shelf Awareness

“An absorbing and redemptive novel of grace, craft and heroic characters.”
-- Berkshire Eagle

“A triumph of storytelling, an ambitious examination of the failures of love and how we, against all odds, find a way to survive.... A complex, resonant work that will reshape your understanding of family.”
-- Kevin Wilson, author of The Family Fang

“All of the luxuriously spun characters in The Last Romantics, entwined via that impossible web we call family, unfold over their many years with the perfect balance of familiarity and wonder that makes turning their pages such a pleasure.”
-- Laurie Frankel, New York Times bestselling author of This Is How It Always Is

“There’s so much love and loss in this book that I read it with a box of tissues, laughing with astonishment through the tears. The kind of book you lose yourself in.”
-- Lisa Gabriele, author of The Winters

Praise for The House Girl:

“Assured and arresting...You cannot put it down.”
-- Chicago Tribune

“[G]rabs you by the bonnet strings and starts running.”
-- Entertainment Weekly

“Conklin ... is a skilled writer ... who knows how to craft a thoughtful page-turner ...We’re glued to the pages.”
-- Seattle Times

“A sorrowful, engrossing novel in which the pursuit of justice serves as a catalyst to a more personal pursuit for truth . . . Through Josephine and Lina’s journeys, The House Girl is also a meditation on motherhood, feminism, loss, and, ultimately, redemption.”
-- Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Skillfully executed and packed with surprises, this novel of the ways in which art saves our humanity is an engrossing do-not-miss adventure.”
-- Shelf Awareness

“A seamless juxtaposition of past and present, of the lives of two women, and of the redemptive nature of art and the search for truth and justice. Guaranteed to keep readers up long past their bedtimes."
-- Library Journal (starred review)

“Luminous . . . The rare novel that seamlessly toggles between centuries and characters and remains consistently gripping throughout . . . Powerful.”
-- BookPage

“Infused with ominous atmosphere and evocative detail...a dramatic montage of narrative and personal testimonies that depicts the grotesque routines of the slave trade, the deadly risks of the Underground Railroad and the impossible choices that slaves and abolitionists faced."
-- Washington Post

“Conklin persuasively intertwines the stories of two women separated by time and circumstances but united by a quest for justice...Stretching back and forth across time and geography, this riveting tale is bolstered by some powerful universal truths.”
-- Booklist

“Tara Conklin’s wise, stirring and assured debut tells the story of two extraordinary women, living a century apart, but joined by their ferocity of spirit. From page one, I fell under the spell of The House Girl's sensuous prose and was frantically turning pages until its thrilling conclusion.”
-- Maria Semple, author of Where'd You Go, Bernadette

The House Girl is a heartbreaking, heartwarming novel, ambitious, beautifully told, and elegantly crafted. Tara Conklin negotiates great vast swaths of time and tribulation, character and place, with grace, insight, and, simply, love.”
-- Laurie Frankel, author of Goodbye for Now and The Atlas of Love

“The House Girl is an enthralling story of identity and social justice told through the eyes of two indomitable women, one a slave and the other a modern-day attorney, determined to define themselves on their own terms.”
-- Hillary Jordan, author of Mudbound and When She Woke

“There’s so much to admire in The House Girl -- two richly imagined heroines, two fully realized worlds, a deeply satisfying plot -- but what made me stand up and cheer was the moral complexity of these characters and the situations they face. I’m grateful for this transporting novel.”
-- Margot Livesey, New York Times bestselling author of The Flight of Gemma Hardy

“The House Girl stands as both a literary memorial to the hundreds of thousands of slaves once exploited in the American South and a mellifluous meditation on the mysterious bonds of family, the hopes and sorrows of human existence, and the timeless quest for freedom.”
-- Corban Addison, author of A Walk Across the Sun

“Tara Conklin’s powerful debut novel is a literary page-turner filled with history, lost love, and buried family secrets. Conklin masterfully interweaves the stories of two women across time, all while asking us to contemplate the nature of truth and justice in America.”
-- Amy Greene, author of Bloodroot

“Exquisite...Conklin takes us down a curious rabbit hole that drops us before a looking glass of uncomfortable truths about race, power, art, family, law and ethics...One of those books in which there’s not one, two or three, but about ten good parts you’ll want to read and reread.”
-- Essence